“Don’t Go in the House” Coming to Blu-Ray in July

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We do not have an exact date yet, but Scorpion will be releasing Don’t Go in the House to Blu-Ray at the end of July, according to their Facebook page. As readers of this blog know, I worked with one of their representatives this past January for a documentary which will be included on the disc as a special feature. While it was originally only going to be a “Then and Now” documentary where I gave a tour of Strauss Mansion matched up with scenes from the movie with some of my own personal ghost stories mixed in, I have now been informed that it will in fact be two separate features. My paranormal experiences will be a separate video. This is all very exciting for me, but more importantly, I hope the release will boost exposure to the museum which served as the film set back in 1979 when it was a private residence-turned-apartment-complex. The house was actually slated for demolition shortly after filming wrapped due to the severe disrepair it fell into. However, the local historical society of Atlantic Highlands stepped in and purchased the 1893 Victorian mansion and turned it into the museum it is today.

Horror fans will be happy to know not much has changed. Though there are museum exhibits, the style and decor of the house is relatively the same. Even the stove used for the flashback scenes when the main character is punished by his mother who would hold his arms over the open flames is still there. When you watch the videos, you will also see some of the first floor windows boarded up. They have since been replaced with new windows thanks to a grant. The Strauss Mansion is starting to look better and better. While the focus is history, I certainly believe it to be haunted and have detailed my experiences in a book, Ghost Hunting Confidential: Investigating Strauss Mansion, and a paranormal web-series I host with my friends. You can come for a visit on weekends, April through December, and inquire about ghosts, history, or both. Admission is free. The historical society is also looking to show the film inside the house at some point this year, either right after the release or in October when we have a full lineup of Halloween-themed events. More information will be forthcoming.

As for the item release itself, it will be available through Scorpion on a limited printing of 1,500 copies, since their rights to the movie expire in December. The film is presented with a brand-new high-definition scan and transfer of the original negative, which includes The Burning (which was the original title) in the opening title card. There will also be audio commentary and an on-camera interview with star Dan Grimaldi, and another interview with cast-member Robert Osth. And of course, the two features hosted by yours truly. Hopefully we will have a release date shortly. I was recently in contact with Andrew Sterling, who I worked with on the features, and he told me that they are nearly complete.

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